Anastasiia, Russia

10 Questions with Anastasiia Pervishko

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Anastasiia Pervishko, 26, from Russia is a Ph.D. student at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

Her fields of interest cover topics of theoretical quantum optics and spintronics.

Anastasiia is a participant of the 66th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting which is dedicated to the field of physics in 2016.

Enjoy the interview with Anastasiia and get inspired:

  1. What inspired you to pursue a career in physics / STEM?

In my childhood I always wanted to become a teacher in order to share my knowledge with other people. At secondary school I enjoyed math and physics, because I loved to solve some tricky problems. Therefore that time thinking about the future career I had two options in my mind. The first was to become a school teacher and the second was to become a scientist, who faces new unsolved problems and simultaneously can teach students. I chose the second path and do not regret about it.

  1. Who are your role models?

There are many role models in Physics. Probably it is very hackneyed example, but the first person who came into my mind is Marie Curie. For me she is an ideal example uniting the self-devotion to science and astonishing love.

  1. How did you get to where you are in your career path?

I was born and grew up in St. Petersburg, Russia, where I studied Physics at St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University. After I completed the studies, I decided to continue my scientific carrier abroad and applied to the one of the world top universities, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, where there was a vacant Ph.D. position in the theoretical group of Prof. Ivan Shelykh, who hospitably accepted me into his group. Since then I am working under his supervision on the subjects of Mesoscopic Optics and Polaritonics and nowadays finishing my Ph.D. program.

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  1. What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?

Since I do theoretical research, the coolest projects for me are the projects, which consist of the combination of theoretical prediction and experimental realization.

  1. What’s a time you felt immense pride in yourself / your work?

I feel pride of my work, when the article which summarizes the key points of my project is finally published. For me it means that it is worthy for attention and supported by scientific community. Of course it was a great honor to be invited to Lindau Nobel Meeting this year as well.

  1. What is a “day in the life” of Anastasiia like?

I spend most of my time on the research and writing the thesis now. Every day is dissimilar. I also have one hour a week of teaching, which requires to prepare for the class, check student papers and discuss difficult parts of the lectures with the students as well.

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  1. What are you seeking to accomplish in your career?

I want to become a competent physicist with broad scientific ideas and interdisciplinary skills. Using this background I would like to conduct the lectures and stimulate the interest of people in science.

  1. What do you like to do when you’re not doing research?

Apart research, I like dancing. I started to attend ballet classes in kindergarten, and since then I am in love with dance. Nowadays I try to combine these interests and find a happy medium. I also like gatherings with friends. I like to cook for them and have a good time talking and playing board games.

  1. What advice do you have for other women interested in physics / STEM?

Your research is definitely interesting and important, but do not forget about the life outside the lab.

  1. In your opinion, what will be the next great breakthrough in physics research?

I will not be ingenious saying that I expect to see a quantum computer.


What should be done to increase the number of female profs of physics?

I can not speak about the difficulties of female profs in Physics, because I am not a professor now. However I think that additional support of the University, covering the family interests and needs will promote the number of women in science.

 

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